This Is Not Latinx
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Tired of the fetishization, racism and cultural appropriation of latinx cultures. Also featured on this blog are latinx issues, and notable/famous latinxs.

motiya:

and if you’re desi (or a poc) raising a son:

please dont let them think they can talk over women

please teach them to help out around the house

please make them responsible for their actions

please don’t assert hypermasculinity as the norm

please let them cry, cry with them

please don’t let them use drugs or alcohol to cope with problems

please raise them to respect, and care for women’s feelings

please dont raise fuckboys

9 minutes ago on 22 August 2014 @ 10:27am + 321 notes
via whitepeoplestealingculture (originally motiya)

destroyer:

virginrosemary:

iconic

fav part ever. YT devil was salty as fuck.

3 hours ago on 22 August 2014 @ 7:25am + 113,525 notes
via crabsitckz (originally jmeswilson)

nigga-chan:

hippydippywoodstocktrippy:

well this is racist and generalizing, yet the people who actually agree with this post are the ones who love to piss and moan about others being racist and generalizing people

A white person wrote this book so please take it up with him if you really that mad

12 hours ago on 21 August 2014 @ 9:43pm + 24,198 notes
via hiphopandinsubordination (originally nigga-chan)
# this

queermenofcolorinlove:

Hello beloved community, 

It’s me again. Thanks to the generosity of my friends, family, and even people I’ve never met, I have been able to raise $460 for my participation in the Tamarindo Half Marathon benefiting Housing Works. I am turning 22 this weekend (#virgo) and what better way to celebrate than to support this important cause?

What exactly does the money I raise do? For one, it will support fierce advocacy to end both homelessness and AIDS, like the Gender Expression Non-Discrimination Act (GENDA) that will legally protect transgender and gender non-conforming people in  housing, jobs, and public accommodations in New York and the passage of New York State legislation that would cap the rents of approximately 10,000 poor New Yorkers with AIDS who receive housing subsidies from New York City.  

In addition, the money I raise will fund life-saving services such as housingmedical and dental carelegal servicesjob trainingmental health services, and care management

Please say happy birthday to me in the form of a tax-deductible donation to Housing Works, and together we will have an AIDS-free New York by 2020

Love, 

Gerardo (moderator of queermenofcolorinlove)

DONATE HERE: http://fundraising.housingworks.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=donordrive.participant&participantID=1703 

H
13 hours ago on 21 August 2014 @ 9:36pm + 65 notes
via eljotitodeperris (originally queermenofcolorinlove)

fucknofetishization:

readreevaluateandcry:

Latinas and Mexicans aren’t there for you to fetishize and throwing black girls under the bus like that isn’t cool. You single for a reason bruh.

say that again. Maybe you’re the problem, not the girls.

H
15 hours ago on 21 August 2014 @ 7:02pm + 551 notes
via xingonaaaa (originally readreevaluateandcry)

chifladazine:

"The way Latin@s, xican@s, and chican@s are represented in the media is disgusting. White women and white people are seen in so many different lights, but when you get into talking about a PoC* group you’re automatically grouped into this lump that you may not even fit into. Latin@s come in different shades and colors, some are Black and some are White so to stereotype a massive group of people into a “tan people with big butts, cute Spanish accents and a passion to dance and cook” it’s neglecting parts of our culture as a whole." 

Read the rest of Laura Christine Sinner’s post on CHIFLADA!

16 hours ago on 21 August 2014 @ 5:51pm + 1,904 notes
via minervahexagram (originally chifladazine)
The Unknown History of Latino Lynchings

thisiswhiteprivilege:

Graphic image under the cut. Jump to the link.

Read More

16 hours ago on 21 August 2014 @ 5:50pm + 3,475 notes
via whitepeoplestealingculture (originally independentcreativeservices)
# violence twdeath tw
The Unknown History of Latino Lynchings

fatandnerdy:

independentcreativeservices:

image

The following is a summary & analysis of Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review article, “Law of the Noose: A History of Latino Lynching” Richard Delgado.

Read More

17 hours ago on 21 August 2014 @ 5:05pm + 3,475 notes
via ohmygil (originally independentcreativeservices)
# violence twracism tw

bad-dominicana:

Because its predictable as fuck.

17 hours ago on 21 August 2014 @ 4:43pm + 827 notes
via latinosexuality (originally bad-dominicana)
# anti-black racism

afrolatiqueer:

Lxs Afrxlatinxs: Queer Afrolatin@ Visibility Project

Here are some photos from the project I’ve been working on for the past few months on Queer Afrolatin@s. Check out this other post with one of the videos from the project.

If you’re interested in participating in the project also, feel free to inbox me. To keep up with project developments check out the facebook page, www.facebook.com/LxsAfrxlatinxs , and follow us on twitter @Lxs_Afrxlatinxs!

18 hours ago on 21 August 2014 @ 4:03pm + 1,357 notes
via afrolatiqueer (originally afrolatiqueer)
reclaimingthelatinatag:

Emma Tenayuca was a Mexican American activist and educator. Born December 21, 1916 in San Antonio, Texas, Tenayuca was a key figure in Texan labor and civil rights activism during the 1930’s, where she organized protests over the beatings of Mexican migrants by United States Border Patrol agents and labor strikes to end unfair wages. As a union activist, she also founded two international ladies’ garment workers unions and was involved in both the Worker’s Alliance of America and Woman’s League for Peace and Freedom. 
Throughout her fight for labor and civil rights, Tenayuca was arrested many times under charges of “disturbing the peace”, even though her participation during protests was strictly peaceful. She was also targeted for being a member of the Communist Party, which resulted in her being “blacklisted” and forced to move out of the San Antonio area 1939. After leaving her hometown she went on to attend San Francisco State College where she majored in Education. Years later Tenayuca returned to San Antonio and earned a master’s in Education from Our Lady of the Lake University, leading her to eventually go on to teach in the Harlandale School District until her retirement in 1982.
Shortly after her retirement Emma Tenayuca was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and passed away on July 23, 1999.

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Emma Tenayuca was a Mexican American activist and educator. Born December 21, 1916 in San Antonio, Texas, Tenayuca was a key figure in Texan labor and civil rights activism during the 1930’s, where she organized protests over the beatings of Mexican migrants by United States Border Patrol agents and labor strikes to end unfair wages. As a union activist, she also founded two international ladies’ garment workers unions and was involved in both the Worker’s Alliance of America and Woman’s League for Peace and Freedom. 

Throughout her fight for labor and civil rights, Tenayuca was arrested many times under charges of “disturbing the peace”, even though her participation during protests was strictly peaceful. She was also targeted for being a member of the Communist Party, which resulted in her being “blacklisted” and forced to move out of the San Antonio area 1939. After leaving her hometown she went on to attend San Francisco State College where she majored in Education. Years later Tenayuca returned to San Antonio and earned a master’s in Education from Our Lady of the Lake University, leading her to eventually go on to teach in the Harlandale School District until her retirement in 1982.

Shortly after her retirement Emma Tenayuca was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and passed away on July 23, 1999.

18 hours ago on 21 August 2014 @ 3:54pm + 1,288 notes
via thepeoplewillnotstaysilent (originally reclaimingthelatinatag)
Hey everyone!

weareallmixedup:

My name’s Lizzie, and I’m the new mod for We Are All Mixed Up

I’m a 20 yr old Ecuadorian Mestiza currently living in Ontario, Canada. I’m in the service industry and also help around as an assistant for UofT’s Indigenous Center.

My interests include videogames, traveling, art, and learning how to address social justice issues.

Some topics that I can talk about from my own experiences are: latinx identity (both outside vs within Latin America), colonialism, blanqueamiento, mestizaje, the casta system, family language barriers, diaspora, internalized racism, historical erasure of Native/African heritage, media representation, violence against (Native) women, the role of religious/non-religious faith in our communities, US imperialism, etc etc

I hope that my personal understandings as a mixed Latina will help contribute something new to the discussions I’ve seen floating around on WAAMU.

I’d be happy to hear from you guys. Here’s wishing for the best!

- Liz 

18 hours ago on 21 August 2014 @ 3:53pm + 51 notes
via weareallmixedup (originally weareallmixedup)
Is wearing a sombrero cultural appropiation? Why?
alexanderdavidt

In what context? Are you Mexican? When and where are you wearing it?

-Rodrigo.

1 day ago on 21 August 2014 @ 9:28am + 8 notes
# alexanderdavidt
This is an odd request but

can people please reblog this post (click here)?

I just found out that I know this boy. He was one of my mom’s former students. She just found out about his death and she’s very upset and I was looking through our blog cus I was gonna ask if anyone had any info and I saw the post.

The Dominican community in NY is very close especially in Washington Heights and I know a lot of people who are affected by his death.

Please just reblog it.

His name is Andy and he is 19 btw. He was a good kid.

-m

puckerrup:

The Young Lords, later Young Lords Organization and in New York (notably Spanish Harlem), Young Lords Party, was a Puerto Rican nationalist group in several United States cities, notably New York City and Chicago.

The Young Lords as a movement focused its activities around Independence for Puerto Rico and the struggle for democratic rights for all Puerto Ricans and Latinos and poor, along with the empowerment of all barrios within the United States.

Their influence extended beyond politics, as the Young Lords inspired young political leaders, professionals and artists, forming part of a Puerto Rican cultural renaissance in the 1970s nationally within the continental United States.

H
1 day ago on 20 August 2014 @ 6:34pm + 141 notes
via puta-del-infierno (originally puckerrup)
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